Sunset Poets Reading Celebrates Recovery Month

Sunday, September 26 2010
3:00 PM to 5:00 PM

Palomar UU Fellowship
1600 Buena Vista Drive
Vista, CA

On Sunday, September 26 at 3pm, Sunset Poets and the Addictions Ministry at Palomar Unitarian Universalist Fellowship will hold a poetry reading to celebrate Recovery Month at Palomar UU Fellowship, 1600 Buena Vista Drive in Vista. Everyone whose life has been touched by addiction should attend. Bring your non-poet friends (if you have any). There will be a featured segment focusing on addiction and recovery, and an open mike. In coming months we'll ask for your help in distributing flyers and spreading the word.
Here is one of my favorite poems on the subject.

On the Death of a Colleague, by Stephen Dunn

She taught theater, so we gathered
in the theater.
We praised her voice, her knowledge,
how good she was
with Godot and just four months later
with Gigi.
She was fifty. The problem in the liver.
Each of us recalled
an incident in which she’d been kind
or witty.
I told about being unable to speak
from my diaphragm
and how she made me lie down, placed her hand
where the failure was
and showed me how to breathe.
But afterwards
I only could do it when I lay down
and that became a joke
between us, and I told it as my offering
to the audience.
I was on stage and I heard myself
wishing to be impressive.
Someone else spoke of her cats
and no one spoke
of her face or the last few parties.
The fact was
I had avoided her for months.

It was a student’s turn to speak, a sophomore,
one of her actors.
She was a drunk, he said, often came to class
reeking.
Sometimes he couldn’t look at her, the blotches,
the awful puffiness.
And yet she was a great teacher,
he loved her,
but thought someone should say
what everyone knew
because she didn’t die by accident.

Everyone was crying. Everyone was crying and it
was almost over now.
The remaining speaker, an historian, said he’d cut
his speech short.
And the Chairman stood up as if by habit,
and said something about loss
and thanked us for coming. None of us moved
except some students
to the student who’d spoken, and then others
moved to him, across dividers,
down aisles, to his side of the stage.

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